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Vitamin E

What is Vitamin E?

The E Vitamin is a vitamin that is necessary for many, if not all of the body’s organs to function properly as well as one that dissolved by fat. It is used to inhibit the oxidation process, thus labeling it an antioxidant because it aids in slowing down the process which damages cells.

What does Vitamin E do? (What is it used for?)

Vitamin E is used for the treatment of a vitamin E deficiency, though rare, it can surface in low birth weight babies and people who were genetically born with disorders. Many people are prescribed vitamin E for the prevention and treatment of heart diseases, arteries that have hardened, blood vessels, if a patient has had chest pain, a heart attack, high blood pressure, or pain in the legs that have resulted from blockage in the arteries. Vitamin E is also suggested to be used for diabetic treatment, cancer prevention, colon and rectal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic and gastric cancers as well. Other uses of vitamin E include but are not limited to; night cramps, epilepsy, cysts in the breasts, restless leg syndrome, brain diseases, problems in the nervous system, radiation, an increase energy, muscle strength improvement, and physical endurance improvements. Sunburns, Asthma, cataracts, impotence, allergy prevention, skin disorders, chronic fatigue syndrome, peptic ulcers, infertility, respiratory infections, aging skin, cystic fibrosis, and some diseases that are inherited, are all great reasons to consume Vitamin E. Some people even apply vitamin E directly to their skin to keep it from aging and to protect against the skin effects of chemicals used for cancer therapy.

Where is Vitamin E found?

The most ideal way to get your daily dose of vitamin E is by consuming foods rich in the vitamin. Vitamin E is found in the following foods: peanuts, sunflower seeds, spinach, cereals, broccoli, many kinds of vegetable oils like; sunflower, corn, wheat germ, safflower, and soybean oils; almonds, hazelnuts, fruit juices, and margarine. It is also available as a supplement.

What happens when someone is Vitamin E deficient?

Eating vitamin E in foods is not risky or harmful. If the supplements are taken in extremely high doses, the risk of bleeding in the body and brain increase drastically. Too much vitamin E can also heighten the chances of defective births.

Helpful sources, supplements and additional benefits of Vitamin E

On top of Vitamin E possessing some powerful properties of oxidation inhibitions, vitamin E; promotes respiratory and heart health, it aids in normalizing symptoms of PMS, helps with hot flashes, supports circulation, and is great for the brain. Though supplements are widely available, antioxidants like vitamin E are highly recommended to be consumed by eating a balanced diet rich in vegetables, whole grains, and fruits, rather than from supplements.

 

AIs (Adequate Intakes)

Infants
0-6 months
7-12 months
Milligrams per Day
4
5
  • 4 microgram = 6 IU
  • 5 microgram = 7,5 IU

RDAs (Recommended Dietary Allowances)

Children
1-3 years
4-8 years
Milligrams per Day
6
7
Males
9-13 years
14-18 years
19-30 years
31-50 years
50-70 years
> 70 years

11
15
15
15
15
15
Females
9-13 years
14-18 years
19-30 years
31-50 years
50-70 years
> 70 years

11
15
15
15
15
15
Pregnancy
< 19 years
19-30 years
31-50 years

15
15
15
Lactation
< 19 years
19-30 years
31-50 years

19
19
19
  • 6 micrograms = 9 IU
  • 7 micrograms = 10.4 IU
  • 11 micgrams = 16.4 IU
  • 15 micrograms = 22.4 IU
  • 19 micrograms = 28.4 IU

Source: USDA Dietary Reference Intakes